In the spirit of simplification, Polaris dropped the word “Classic” from its 2-Up models. They’re now simply called “Touring.”
Comfort features increase along with the price and displacement. In all, there are two fan-cooled models, one liquid-cooled two-stroke and three four-strokes. The fan-cooled models will likely appeal to rental agencies or those buying a machine for occasional use. Serious multi-day, long-distance riders or 2-Up riders will want the upgraded features of the higher-end models.
Though the machines are all different, there are some common threads throughout the lineup. All use the P-85 primary and Team Industries LWT secondary clutch combination. All have PERC push-button reverse, underseat storage and a removable passenger seat. All come in black.
Common to the liquid-cooled and four-stroke models are the Rider Select adjustable steering, pillow-top seat and IQ skis that lessen steering effort.
The FST IQ Cruiser is the new flagship, with what Polaris calls the functionality of a mini-van and the sportiness of a Mustang. It’s a machine made for high-speed, long-distance saddlebag trips. The rear seat replaces with a hard-top storage case. Other features include the M-10 ACE rear suspension and an air temperature gauge.

Front Suspension: EDGE; Shocks/ Travel: Nitrex/10 inches; Rear Suspension: EDGE 136; Shocks/ Travel: Nitrex (front), Nitrex Select (rear)/13.9 inches; Features: This setup is on the fan-cooled models. The rear suspension has a coupler to adjust for the additional cargo or passenger weight. The track is 136 inches long with a 1-inch lug.
550 Fan:
The Trail Touring Deluxe uses a twin-cylinder, 544cc engine. It received NiCaSil-lined cylinders as an upgrade this year. Emissions came down, fuel economy went up. It produces 60 hp.

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