Arctic Cat released its all-new, 2007 Jaguar Z1 performance four-stroke.Arctic Cat has launched its 2007 Jaguar Z1. The rumor mill has been churning about this model. Read up to dispel the myths.

The Jaguar is Arctic Cat’s new performance four-stroke with a 1056cc EFI, twin-cylinder engine. The naturally aspirated, dry-sump design produces a claimed 125 hp with a 12:1 compression ratio. Power gets to the ground with an improved ACT/Diamond Drive system: it now offers push-button reverse. The reverse drive is mechanical with a servo-driven engagement. The system has a speed sensor and rpm limiter that will not allow the reverse to engage when the machine is rolling forward.

The Jaguar looks like no other Cat before because it isn’t. The new Twin Spar chassis uses robotic self-piercing rivets to fasten components for improved ridigity. Cat claims torsional rigidity of the new chassis is 46.4 percent stiffer than the Firecat chassis.

The rear of the machine houses a new cooling system design. Unlike traditional designs, the rear heat exchanger is not mounted flush to the underside of the tunnel. The resulting space on the topside of the cooler allows for snow and airflow to remove heat from both surfaces. As a result, greater cooling efficiency allows for less surface area, which results in a smaller cooler. The rear heat exchanger is also designed as a support member of the chassis, aiding in overall chassis rigidity.

A seventh generation AWS front suspension features a front CNC-machined subframe and forged spindles and shock towers for added strength. The lower A-arms are boxed for added strength and the added rigidity should improve overall handling, Cat said. The rear suspension on the new F-Series comes from the 440 Sno Pro race sled.

The Slide Action rear skid allows for full front arm travel, while controlling weight transfer, for better cornering and handling under acceleration. Cat engineers said the result is reduced ski lift and front-end push while cornering, anti-squat resistance while accelerating and improved G-bump control.

Overall driver positioning is rider forward, but Cat wanted to have the chassis accommodate a foot forward placement as well to reduce rider fatigue. The seating position places riders with a 90-degree bend at the knees.

Our brief ride on the Jaguar late last year proved the machine rides much lighter than Cat’s other four-stroke sleds. Look for more news on the new Jaguar, and the rest of the 2007 Arctic Cats in future issues of Snow Goer and in our sister magazine, Snow Week.

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